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Also Served: Edward Henry -

Edward HENRY


19, Sutherland Road, Prescot

Sergeant 2857, 5th Bn., South Lancashire Regiment


The above picture, which appeared in the Prescot Reporter, was captioned, "5th South Lancs, wounded, of Prescot. Son of a Prescot Crimean veteran who died recently and has been mentioned for conspicuous bravery"

(Later 240863 , from March 1917)

Edward was born in 1879 in Prescot. He attended Prescot Grammar School By the 1911 census, he was 32 and working as a Coal Miner Hewer. He lived at 5, Parkers Court, Prescot with his wife, Eliza, 29, and their children. In addition, Edward's father, 81 year old Thomas Henry, lived with them. Listed as a retired Pensioner of the 89th Regiment of Foot, Thomas was a native of Kings County, Ireland.

Edward enlisted to the 1/5th Bn of the South Lancs Regiment on 19th September 1914. After training, the Battalion sailed for France from Southampton aboard the ss 'King Edward' on 13th February 1915, and Edwards's Medal Index Card confirms that he went overseas with them.

His records show that he received a Gun Shot Wound to the back on 31st May 1915, and after treatment at Casualty Clearing Stations and Field Hospitals, he rejoined his unit on 6th July. In December 1916, Edward was appointed to the post of Lance Corporal, and then on 31st July 1917 was promoted to the rank of Sergeant.

Edward was once again Wounded in Action, this time Gun Shot Wound to the left thigh on 21st September 1917. This was more severe and after treatment in France he returned to the UK 4th October 1917.

Being classed as 'No longer physically fit for military service, he was discharged at Shrewsbury on 24th December 1917, also suffering from Bronchitis. He was 37 years old when discharged.

Edward was awarded a pension in November 1918. At that time he was working as a Dataller (Roofing in a Coal Mine) but his pension report stated that he was losing time from work as a result of his illness and injuries.

Edward was awarded the Military Medal for bravery in the field, and this award was gazetted on 28th September 1917. Although the reason for the award is not known, this date of award suggests that the action would have been part of the Third Battle of Ypres, better known as Passchendaele.



Edward's Military Medal Card, courtesy of John Yates





Edward's entry in the London Gazette, announcing the award of his Military Medal



As well as the Military Medal, Edward was entitled to the 1915 Star, British War Medal, Victory Medal and Silver War Badge.

After working in the mines, by November 1919 Edward was employed at the BI Cable Works in Prescot, where he worked as a Furnaceman. On 1st November 1919 he accidentally fell into a tank of boiling water. He was taken to St Helens Hospital where he died from burns 12 hours later. An inquest was held on 10th November, returning a verdict of Misadventure. Edward was 40 years old.

He was buried in St Mary's Churchyard on 12th November 1919.

Ref. No.: A1106



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